What kind of jewellery?

Answer to this question will largely determine what kind of  jewellery photography service you would need.

The case studies presented here will give you an idea of how I approach jewellery photography and what kind of photographs you could expect. You’ll find examples of:

  • affordable craft style accessory pieces
  • affordable costume jewellery
  • fashion Stirling silver pieces
  • fine jewellery made with precious metals and rare gem stones
  • art deco jewellery made with precious metals and rare gem stones.

How much does it cost?

The cost of jewellery photography will hugely vary depending on what types of jewellery products you have.

Broadly speaking, non-reflective accessories made with everyday materials are going to be easier and simpler to photograph than reflective metal (silver, gold or platinum) pieces with gem stones.

Contact me with a brief description of your jewellery products so that I could provide you with a cost estimate.

You’re ready to talk?

Contact me for a chat. We’d love to discuss how we could make your jewels look their best.

Contact Us

Case Study 1 – Lulame

Product

Recycled or up-cycled craft accessories made with textile, leather and found pieces

Lighting setup

One light source, a light diffuser and reflector on the opposite side of the light

Shooting

2 hour shooting for 100 pieces

Delivery

Minimally retouched product photos delivered within 1 business day

Case Study 2 – Hundre

Product

Affordable costume jewellery and accessories made with non-precious metals and beads

Lighting setup

Several lights with different diffusers and staging kits to photograph variety of pieces

Shooting

Day long shoot

Delivery

Approx. 130 Completely retouched images within 7 business days

Case Study 3 – Grace & Scarper

Product

Stirling silver jewellery designers based in Perth

Lighting setup

White background light and top light

Shooting

1.5 hour shooting for 11 pieces

Delivery

Minimally retouched and deep etched (completely white background) product photos delivered within 1 business day

Case Study 4 – Euphoria Jewels

Product

Fine Jewellery. Precious metal and rare gem stone jewels.

Lighting

Cone shaped light modifier for metal only rings and special lighting setup for gem stone pieces

Shooting

Multiple Days to shoot 140 fine jewels

Delivery

Several hundreds images delivered in stages

Case Study 5 – Esola

Product

Fine Jewellery. Precious metal and rare gem stone jewels.

Lighting

Special lighting setup for gem stone pieces

Shooting

Multiple Days to shoot 14 pieces

Delivery

Five high resolution images for a roadside banner and nine standard high resolution images delivered within a week

OUR ADVICE ON JEWELLERY PHOTOGRAPHY

Some useful information when you need your jewels photographed by a professional or when you want to do it yourself.

GENERAL ADVICE

If you’re after polished and professional photographs for your products and for your website, consider the following:

  • Make sure that your pieces have been professionally cleaned
  • Fine jewels that are not clean take much longer to retouch and additional fee will incur if the pieces are not clean
  • Ensure that you have an adequate insurance coverage for your products as they will leave your premise to a photographic studio
  • Jewellery or any other fine/small product photo shoots take longer than you would probably think. As an example, it could take as much as four hours to do a shoot for 10-15 pieces of jewellery
  • If you have a large quantity of jewels to photograph we may outsource the retouching work
  • Organisation is key when shooting jewels. It helps if you have product names and the code in a list format. That way we could name image files according to your list.

DIY TIPS

I have seen creative jewellery designers doing their own photography. If you do want to do it yourself here’s my list of suggestions.

  • If you have products similar to Lulame (case study 1) I could teach you how to photograph. That is what happened with the client. I photographed the client’s initial big batch. Then I taught them how to photograph their future pieces.
  • If you have pieces that are mainly reflective metal, you could also try to shoot yourself. For reflective pieces, I suggest getting yourself a shooting cone. Refer to my post on how to make your own shooting cones. 
  • Whether you have a DSLR or a mobile phone to photograph pieces, make sure you take advantage of ‘macro’ settings.
  • When shooting small pieces up close you need higher F stop (i.e. F16 and up) to get most of the object in focus. In some instances, you won’t get the entire piece in focus even at F22. That’s when we composite/focus stack images.
  • If your products are mainly fine precious metal/gem stone pieces it’s better to work with professional photographers. That’s because it is not only difficult to capture gem stones and metals correctly but also it requires quite a lot of retouching after the shooting.
  • You wouldn’t believe the amount of dust and finger prints your camera (macro lens) picks up from a small piece. It’s real pain to clean them in Photoshop so clean the jewel before photographing.

You’re ready to talk?

Call up for a chat. We’d love to discuss how we could make your jewels and accessories look their best.

Contact Us