Location or my Studio

Generally speaking, products are shot outdoors/on location when they are better visualised in context/situation such as furniture and interior design pieces. In these cases, there will be a stylist who arranges pieces to be photographed. Or you may have a huge quantity of products to be photographed and logistically it is easier for me to travel to you with all of the equipment. In this scenario, I’d set up a shooting area in your store/warehouse.

If you’re interested in location product photography you’d want to check out my other product photography page with tips and advice on the styled location photo shoot.

Some products are best photographed not in-situ and it’s better shot larger than life (macro) to show its details. That is when the clients bring their products to my studio to be photographed.

What is your product?

This is usually what I’d ask first when I get contacted for product photo shoots. Are they glass bottles, jars, fabric, food or fine jewellery? The surface material and the type of products determine the complexity of work and the length of shooting time. That is because lighting and diffusion (aka light shaping) change depending on the reflectiveness of the product surface. Also, generally speaking, the smaller the product the harder it is to take photographs.

How much does it cost?

Contact me with your requirements so that I could provide you with a cost estimate. I find that clients tend to be conservative with their estimates and requirements.  That’s why I present cases studies here so that you get some ideas as to what is possible and how long things take to shoot, process and deliver.

You’re ready to talk?

Contact me for a chat. We’d love to discuss how we could make your products look their best.

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Case Study 1 – Foam Sales

Product

Large size foam sheets, blocks, shapes, cutting tools, exercise and medical equipment

Where

Foam Sales store due to the size (large sheets were 2.4 meters tall)  and the number of products

Shooting

2 Full days of shooting of over 300 products

Delivery

321(white deep-etched) photographs delivered within five business days

Case Study 2 – Julie Anne Lucas

Product

Couture Millinery. Race hats worn by a model, photos taken in multiple angles to show different sides of each hat.

Where

Julie Anne Lucas Millinery. Logistically it was simpler for the shoot to happen at the client’s atelier.

Shooting

4 hours

Delivery

70 Completely retouched high resolution images within 7 business days

Case Study 3 – Euphoria Jewels

Product

Fine Jewellery. Precious metal and gem stone jewels.

Where

My Product Photography Studio

Shooting

Multiple Days to shoot 140 fine jewels

Delivery

Several hundreds images delivered in stages

Case Study 4 – Machette Carbon Fibre Wallets

Product

Carbon fibre wallets

Where

My Product Photography Studio

Shooting

2 hours shooting & 3 hours processing

Delivery

15 Retouched images delivered within 12 hours

OUR ADVICE ON STUDIO PRODUCT PHOTOGRAPHY

Some useful information when you need your products photographed by a professional or when you want to do it yourself.

GENERAL ADVICE

If you’re after polished and professional photographs for your products and for your website, consider the following:

  • I believe clothing products are best shown on models. If you’re thinking about fashion product photography, consider having a model, a stylist and a makeup artist as well as a photographer. Therefore, budget accordingly.
  • Jewellery or any other fine/small product photo shoots take longer than you would probably think. Plan your session realistically. As an example, it could take as much as four hours to do a shoot for 10-15 pieces of jewellery.
  • Fine object photo shoots can take place at our studio (lighting equipped).
  • If you don’t know anyone who can help you with styling your products, I could recommend those I work with on a regular basis.
  • Fees for stylists and make-up artists are separate to the photo shoot session fees and they are indicated in our invoice.
  • As with any other services, the final images you receive are ready for use (no additional post-production should be required). In the case of online stores, please specify exact dimensions so that we can deliver images to the specified size.
  • Organisation is key when shooting products. It helps if you have product names, corresponding SKU and how they will be paired for styling. That way when you receive hundreds (or thousands) of images, the list will help you a great deal. It also helps us to name image files according to your list.

DIY TIPS

There’s nothing stopping you from having a go yourself. Here’s a list of things you could look out for:

  • eBay is a great place to look for table top photography gear. There’s a business named TableTop Photography but you don’t have to get their stuff (quite pricey actually). There are lots of alternatives. Most importantly, their lighting equipment is not compatible with AU power supply!
  • Consider different light modifications to soften your light. There are lots of DIY light tents made with all kinds of stuff (e.g. cardboard boxes) or just buy one (cheap).
  • More light isn’t always the best. Try finding a right exposure using different ISO, aperture and shutter speed settings.
  • Having a tripod is a good thing when shutter speed is going to go lower than 1/60th
  • Shoot both portrait and landscape modes and see what works best for your final output format
  • Be careful with the background colour ‘white’. The ‘white’ won’t come out white depending on how dark or bright your object is in any given setting. That basically means you may have to change camera settings each time depending on the object colour
  • In a lot of cases, white background is created after the shoot via ‘deep-etching’.
  • Try not to go too wide with your aperture (as in low F stop numbers) as this may result in blurring in undesired areas. Blurred images may not work best for your products.
  • The correct aperture setting is specially critical when shooting small objects very close up. In that instance (Macro shoot) any aperture wider than F5 (e.g. F4 or F2.8 etc) may give you a more depth of field than you need (making the back parts of the product very blurry).
  • When in doubt, just use your camera’s automatic Macro setting and hope for the best! :)

You’re ready to talk?

Call up for a chat. We’d love to discuss how we could make your products look their best.

Contact Us